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Court of protection deputy

What is a Court of Protection Deputy? When is a Court of Protection Deputy Required?  What is the role of a Court of Protection Deputy?

When someone loses mental capacity and has not prepared a Lasting Power of Attorney to manage his/ her affairs, the Court of Protection will appoint someone to manage their property and finances.  This person is known as a Court of Protection Deputy.

In most cases a close family member will become the Court of Protection Deputy, but there are circumstances when it is preferred to appoint a professional person, usually a solicitor.

Andrew Isaacs Law act as Professional Deputy for many clients.  Our role as Court of Protection Deputy, is to ensure that our clients have everything they need to enhance the quality of their lives, e.g., accommodation, care, therapies, equipment, and to ensure they are empowered to make choices and be involved in decisions as much as possible.

Andrew Isaacs Law are supervised by the Office of the Public Guardian and the amount we can charge for our services is decided by the Court.

The relationship between a Professional Deputy and the client is very personal and can last for many years and we pride ourselves on building close personal relationships with our clients.

What is a Court of Protection Deputy responsible for?

  • Looking after the person’s property
  • Opening a deputyship bank account
  • Claiming all relevant benefits
  • Paying bills
  • Buying clothes and personal items
  • Preparing accounts annually or on request by the court
  • Keeping important items safe
  • Dealing with the person’s tax affairs
  • Making sure the person’s money is being used to give a good quality of life

Contact us today to arrange a consultation.

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Andrew Isaacs Law Ltd
Unit 7, Atlas Business Park,
Balby Carr Bank, Doncaster,
DN4 5JT

01302 349 480

Call us now, our phone lines are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 01302 349 480 or fill out our enquiry form here